Research: Sea Air is Really Good For Health



   A study has found a positive association between living near the coast and good health.

  Researchers based in Devon and Cornwall have found that those people who live closer to the sea tend       to be healthier.

  However, it’s not merely those who live in bucolic seaside areas that see the benefits, but the biggest effect   is actually felt by those people who are living in coastal cities such as Newcastle and Southampton, in          comparison to inland ones like Birmingham and Leeds.

  Ben Wheeler, a public health expert from Exeter University, was not certain regarding how much it had to      do with the salty air.

  According to Wheeler, it could be that the sea may leave a calming impact on people, or that those people   who lived near it had an additional incentive to get out and about.


   While conducting the census, respondents were asked to rate their health as: good, fairly good, or not good  and just over two-    thirds or 69 percent of respondents rated it as ‘good’ at the national level.

  However, people who were living within three miles or 5 km of the coast were slightly more likely to rate their  health higher than   those  who were living more than 30 miles (50km) inland.

  The impact was broadened to those who were living in the band 12 to 30 miles, i.e. 20-50km from the sea,    though comparatively less stronger.

  The outcomes have suggested that the important thing was how frequently people got to the coast, and how  it was woven into     their lives.

 The study has been published in the journal Health and Place and took into account variations in both age  and wealth between  people from different areas.

  See more at: http://www.newstodaydigest.com/research-sea-air-is-really-good-for-health/12576/#sthash.0m7b1Ht0.dpuf

The Legend of the Sand Dollar

There’s a lovely little legend
That I would like to tell,
Of the birth and death of Jesus
Found in this lowly shell.

If you examine closely
You’ll see that you find here,
Four nail holes and a fifth one
Made by a Roman’s spear.

On one side the Easter Lily,
Its center is the star,
That appeared unto the shepherds
And led them from afar.

The Christmas Poinsettia
Etched on the other side,
Reminds us of His birthday
Our happy Christmastide.

Now break the center open
And here you will release,
The five white doves awaiting
To spread Good Will and Peace.

This simple little symbol
Christ left for you and me,
To help us spread His Gospel
Through all Eternity

Let me help you buy or sell your Florida Gulf Coast Real Estate

Debbie Gardiner 

 REALTOR®

​Deborah J. Gardiner, P.A.


  Premiere Plus Realty Co.

370 12th Ave S Ste. # 101

Naples, FL  34102 

&  

277 N Collier Blvd 

Marco Island, Fl  34145

Mobile:  239-784-7947


debgardiner@live.com

     Click Here For Live Doppler Radar

       Marco Island ​& Naples Florida Real Estate for Sale

 A Sunset Spectacle: The Green Flash

  Myth or Reality?

  The "green flash" is the encore to Mother Nature's spectacular sunset lightshow. Myths, legends and      disputes about its existence are many, but there is no doubt the green flash is real. There is also no  doubt that the flash sometimes is not green.

 What is the Green Flash?

 Like the name says, it is a flash of green seen at the beginning of sunrise and at the end of sunset, just  above the disk of the setting sun. It usually appears in a clear sky. The flash can also be blue, yellow,  green or violet. Green, however, is the most common.

 What Causes the Green Flash Effect?

 The green flash has much in common with the ordinary, everyday red and orange sunsets. The same  characteristics and conditions are shared by both. The setting sun doesn't just happen-behind the  glowing colours, science is at work.

 What the human eye sees during a sunset are bent light rays from a sun already down behind the  horizon. The atmosphere is responsible for this bending. Therefore, what appears to be the tip of the sun  sliding out of view is, in reality, an image created by these bent light rays.

 A quirk of the atmosphere is that it scatters blue light more than any other colour of light. So, even though  the blue light is "bent" the most, its scattering causes its colour to be diffused and spread across the sky.  In this way, the warm glows of red and yellow remain to colour our sunsets, while the sky is blue.

 During the average sunset, first the red vision of the sun vanishes and then the yellow, green, blue and  violet. Blue and violet flashes are less common than green flashes because a haze in the air removes the  violet and the blue, too, leaving the green flash as the last spurt of light visible on the "top" of the sun. If  the air is very clear, a "violet flash" occurs.